Grammar can be such a garbage-load of gobbledygook for those who grapple to grasp the many gibberish-like rules of grammar!  However, unless you master its mechanics, you'll remain a slave to all the Grammar-Nazis in school and in the world!  

So Get Ready for a Grammar Gear-Up by Clicking on the iLessons Below:

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Unit 1: Does Grammar Matter?

https://ed.ted.com/on/hcHdkcUO

It can be hard sometimes to remember all of the grammatical rules that guide us when we’re writing. Dive into the age-old argument between linguistic prescriptivists & descriptivists — who have two very different opinions on the matter.

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Unit 2: How to Use Apostrophes

https://ed.ted.com/on/MVM9WSsD

It’s possessive. It’s often followed by S’s. And it’s sometimes tricky when it comes to its usage. It’s the apostrophe. Laura McClure gives a refresher on when to use apostrophes in writing.

 

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Unit 3: What's the Comma Story?

https://ed.ted.com/on/Mms6YbCw

It isn't easy holding complex sentences together (just ask a conjunction or a subordinate), but the clever little comma can help lighten the load. But how to tell when help is really needed? Terisa Folaron offers some tricks of the comma trade.

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Unit 4: How to Use a Semi-Colon

https://ed.ted.com/on/Nm9vl0Rs

It may seem like the semicolon is struggling with an identity crisis. It looks like a comma crossed with a period. Maybe that’s why we toss these punctuation marks around like grammatical confetti; we’re confused about how to use them properly. Emma Bryce clarifies best practices for the semi-confusing semicolon.

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Unit 5: Modifiers Misplaced 

https://ed.ted.com/on/xZt5Q2bS

Modifiers are words, phrases, and clauses that add information about other parts of a sentence—which is usually helpful. But when modifiers aren’t linked clearly enough to the words they’re actually referring to, they can create unintentional ambiguity. Emma Bryce navigates the sticky world of misplaced, dangling and squinting modifiers.